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Thailand Cultural Tour
Thailand Cultural Tour

Duration : 4 days

Starting from : Grand Palace

Ending at : Doi Tung

Duration : First time travelers, Senior

Overview :

Begin with Bangkok’s top historical and cultural attractions, travel up to Ayutthaya historical park (a UNESCO world heritage site), and finish in Chiang Mai, home of spectacular mountains and exotic hill tribes.

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Day by Day Itinerary : Day 1 (Bangkok) - Day 2 (Ayutthaya) - Day 3 (Chiang Rai) - Day 4 (Chiang Rai)

Bangkok

Day 1 : Bangkok

Bangkok

Grand Palace

The outstanding Grand Palace is an architectural marvel and the gem of Bangkok's impressive collection of temples and palaces. However, the four main buildings are incorporated in the grounds of the glittering Wat Phra Keo. This is the must to visit the experience of its diverse styles that no one should miss.

The entrance fee is THB 250 which includes the allowance entrance to Vimanmek Palace and Abhisek Dusit Throne Hall. The opening hours are from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. from Monday to Sunday.

It is situated at Na Phralan Road, Bangkok 10200 Thailand. For more details, you can contact at Tel: +66 2 222 0094 / +66 2 222 6889 / +66 2 222 2208 or visit the website at www.palaces.thai.net or email at webmaster@palaces.thai.net

Wat Pho

Wat Pho also known as Wat Phra Chetuphon situated just behind the extravagance of the Temple of the Emerald Buddha. Most western tourists never miss to visit the temple's huge reclining Buddha and other attractions of the temple.

The most attractive point other than the Buddha's face are the soles of the Buddha's feet, 45 meters (150 feet) away from the head, which have been inlaid with mother-of-pearl to display the 108 auspicious signs which distinguish a true Buddha.

Moreover, Wat Pho is also Thailand's oldest learning center and a respected Thai massage school that operates teaching techniques to the eager and providing massages to the weary.

The entrance fee is worth only THB20. However, the contact details are: 2 Sanamchai Road, Bangkok 10200 Thailand. Tel: +66 2 222 5910, +66 2 226 2942, +66 2 226 1743, +66 2 225 9595

Wat Arun

Wat Arun gets its name from Aruna, the Indian god of the dawn, hence its common name The Temple of Dawn.

The location of the temple is in the area that used to be occupied by the palace of King Taksin who re-established the Siamese Kingdom after the fall of Ayuttaya more than two hundred years ago. The main Buddha image is believed to have been designed by King Rama II.

Wat Arun, often called The Temple of Dawn, is one of the most remarkable visual identities of Bangkok. The imposing Khmer-style prang or tower is 104 metres tall and decorated with bits of porcelain that was used as ballast by boats coming from China. It is surrounded by four smaller prangs. Construction of the prangs were started by King Rama II and completed by King Rama II.

Jim Thompson's House and Museum

Jim Thompson's House and Museum is a small but fine museum, being the former home of the man who saved the Thai silk industry from collapse. It is constructed from six different traditional teak houses; the walls were reassembled from the outside in.

The museum shows Jim Thompson's beautiful collection of art and artifacts from Thailand and Southeast Asia.

It opens at 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. from Monday to Sunday; last tour is at 4:30 p.m. It is located at Rama I Road, 6 Soi Kasemsan 2, Bangkok 10330 Thailand. For more information, please visit http://www.jimthompsonhouse.com or contact at Tel: +66 2 216 7368

MBK

MBK is the perfect place for those who love shopping in a market style atmosphere but prefer to do so in air-conditioned comfort. Bargaining is a common issue at MBK. However, you should be careful of the products against imitation such as clothes, watches and others.

The opening hours of the MBK center are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. from Monday to Sunday. It is situated at Phayathai Road, Bangkok 10330 Thailand. For more details, you can visit http://www.mbk-center.com/ or email at marketing@mbk-center.com or contact at: +66 2 620 9000.

Erawan Shrine

Erawan Shrine is built incongruously in one of Bangkok's hubs of consumerism. This very popular shrine is devoted to Brahma and Erawan, his elephant. It is located next to the Grand Hyatt Erawan Hotel. The shrine was beset by a series of accidents during its construction in the 1950s. You can often get to see traditional Thai dancing over here. It is a public place and is free to visit 24 hours a day from Monday to Sunday.

It is situated at 494 Ratchawithi Road (corner of Ploenchit and Ratchiwithi), Bangkok 10330.

Ayutthaya

Day 2 : Ayutthaya - Bangkok

Ayutthaya

Wat Chaiwatthanaram

The temple is located on the bank of the Maenam Chao Phraya (River), to the west of the city island. It is built in 1630 by King Prasat Thong to honor his mother. Wat Chai Wattanaram was conceived as a replica of the Angkor temple.

A Royal monastery, the temples unique feature is a huge prang which is surrounded by smaller prangs. This symbolizes Mount Meru, the abode of the heavenly gods. The temple is also accessible by a long-tailed boat trip from Chankasem Palace Pier. This 1-hour round trip to the temple costs about THB300 - 400. Entry fee to the temple is only THB20.

Wat Phra Si Sanphet

Wat Pra Si Sanphet was built by King U-Thong upon the founding of the city in 1491 inside the compound of the Grand Palace. Its foundations are still visible-and served as the royal chapel, as Wat Phra Kaeo does in Bangkok. It used to be the royal palace as a residential palace. It became a monastery in the reign of King Ramathibodi I.

When King Borom Trai Lokanat commanded the construction of new living quarters, this residential palace was transformed into a temple, and the establishment of Wat Phra Si Sanphet. In Ayutthaya's heyday, this was the largest temple in the city.

The three main chedis which have been restored contain the ashes of three Ayutthaya kings. The temple is situated at the northern end of Si Sanphet Road. The royal chapel does not have any monks and novice inhabitants.

Wat Yai Chai Mongkhon

Located to the Southeast of the island, this temples lofty chedi is visible from most of the town. The monastery was built in 1900 by King U-thong who granted the temple with the name Wat Pra Kaeo. The intention was to create a center of Buddhist studies (Ceylonese Sect). As the temple used to be headed by a patriarch, local people also called it Wat Chao Phraya Thai.

The present name was given granted to the temple by King Naresuan to commemorate a battle fought against the Crown Prince of Burma in 1592. His momentous victory a single-handed combat on the elephant back brought independence to Ayutthaya after 15 years as a Burmese dependent. Within the complex is a huge image of a reclining Buddha in brick and stucco. The chedi is bell-shaped, about 60 meters high, constructed on a mound of raised ground (15 X 32.4 X 32.4 m.) with steps going up to the Buddhist image placed midway to the top. The chedi itself now has a distinct tilt, but still can be entered via the stairs.

The Ubosot or ordination hall is windowless but ventilated by pierced holes stretching down the roof on both walls. Also situated in the compound is King Naresuans statue, which is highly revered by Thais.

The entrance fee is THB20.

Bang Pa-in Summer Palace

Bang Pa-in Summer Palace is situated a few miles down the Chao Phraya River from Ayutthaya. The site was first used by the royal court as a summer retreat in the 17th century. However, the Palace was destroyed with the fall of Kingdom of Ayutthaya and was restored by King Rama IV in the mid-19th century.

Most of the buildings that exist today date from the reign of King Rama V, who regularly spent his summers there. The structures represent a variety of architectural styles, set in a large park around ponds and waterways. The only royal residence open to the public is the Chiness-style Wehat Chamroon Palace, constructed entirely of materials imported from China. In addition, there is an Italian-style palace, a circular pavilion with steps leading down to a pool, the graceful Thai-style Aisawan Tippaya Asna Pavilion in the middle of a lake, and, across one of the waterways, a Buddhist chapel in the neo-Gothic style with stained-glass windows. Scattered around the extensive gardens are European statues as well as monuments ordered to be built by King Rama V in memory of members of his family, one of them a much-loved Queen who drowned in a boating accident.

Chiang Rai

Day 3 : Chiang Rai

Chiang Rai

Wat Phra Kaeo

Wat Phra Kaeo, which is located on Trairat Road on the northwest side of town, is the best known of the northern temples. It once housed the Emerald Buddha, Thailand's most important Buddha statue which was discovered in 1444. The statue had been moved by various state rulers to be placed in their capitals including Lampang, Chiang Rai and Vientiane before finally being enshrined in Bangkok's royal Wat Phra Kaeo.

There is now a green jade replica of the image on display. The temple also houses a 700-year bronze statue of Phra Chao Lan Thong, which is housed in the Chiang Saen style ubosot.

Wat Phra That Chedi Luang

Next to Chiang Saen National museum is an ancient 88-meter high, bell-shaped, Lanna style principal chedi which has a 24 meter circumference base. Constructed in 1290 by King Saen Phu, the 3rd ruler of the Lanna kingdom, it is the tallest religious Lanna monument in Chiang Rai. In addition, there are also remains of ancient vihans and chedis.

Chiang Rai

Day 4 : Chiang Rai

Chiang Rai

Doi Mae Salong

Doi Mae Salong is the site of Santi Khiri village, a community settled by the former Chinese 93rd Division who moved from Myanmar to reside on Thai territory in 1961. The village became well known for its enchanting scenery and tranquil atmosphere.

Today it is a major tourist attraction with its small-town ambience, delicious native Chinese dishes, small hotels and guesthouses catering to visitors and tea, coffee and fruit tree plantations. The scenery is especially picturesque in December and January when sakuras are in full bloom.

Scattered with many hill tribe villages, Doi Mae Salong is ideal for trekking.

Doi Tung

Doi Tung is located in Mae Fa Luang District and can be reached by taking Highway No.110 for about 48 kilometers and turning left onto Highway No. 1149, an asphalt road leading directly to Doi Tung. The route winds through beautiful scenery with many interesting sites including the Doi Tung Palace (Pra Tamnak Doi tung), the Mae Fa Luang Garden and Akha and Muser tribal villages.

In addition to scenic lookouts, the most notable attraction is the Phra That Doi Tung Holy Relic, an old religious site atop the mountain.